ilivemauka


Tea leave
November 19, 2011, 7:34 am
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Today I planted the tea leave from Kaniakapupu in our little garden.  It reminds me on the field trip and on how our guide ask for permit to enter the Heiau, how we worked together to maintain the place and how we made our own instruments out of bamboo. I still don’t know how to get a sound out of it, but it knows that I am going to take it to Germany if I can make it till I leave.

At the time I planted the tea leave it started to rain and I felt the blessing of the rain which reminded me on Kukaniloko where the blessing rain came when we finished our Pule breathing in our Pikos, breathing in the community, Hawaii and the world, grounding ourselves standing at the Piko of the island getting connected with the universe. I left a stone for my ancestors. That was really touchy as I didn’t think so much about and also of my ancestors till then.

Mahalo for the I’ke…



Stand Up Padle and Poi
November 5, 2011, 12:31 am
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Today I want to share a little about my last Island Surfing Sides Class with Ian:

First thing was our stand up padle lesson at Kualoa Beach Park across Chinaman’s Hat on the Northern end of Kane’ohe Bay. I really loved trying this out! Ian, mahalo for the opportunity and kokua. Mahalo for driving the boards there in advance (even if I still don’t really know how you did it… With two cars?) and for helping us and giving advice. It is so interesting how I felt insecure standing on the board first and then later just got the feeling somehow. Amazing!!! Just look up… 😉

Don’t want to miss this experience!

Stopping at the Taro Factory was the second highlight of the day and I loved listening to uncle Calvin’s story about the Taro, the older brother! I love the Hawaiian language. It just makes so much sense coming from “Oha” to “Ohana”… And still having the word “Ha” somewhere in it…. Those words are just amazing.

Great Saturday!

(Oha=(taro)branch; Ohana=family; Ha=breathing;Kokua=help)



Where is my Mana?
October 14, 2011, 7:25 am
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We are talking about culture. I see how Hawaiians fight for their culture and try to maintain or even rediscover it. I hear all those tales about Hawaiian Gods and how they are related to the land. And I feel the energy, the mana of the land. Everywhere.  But where is my mana? It makes me feel sad, but I realize that I don’t feel my own mana. In fact I have to travel around the globe to actually feel that there must be something like this where I come from as well. Hawaii connects me with my roots at home. Mahalo. I feel the forest, that I didn’t walk through with awareness before, I feel the earth somewhere deep inside of me. But there are no stories to tell, few songs to sing and even less customs I could tell you about. On my way back home I started singing the German national hymen and surprisingly I could not remember the last word. We usually don’t sing our hymen, because people are still so ashamed of what happened at world war the second that they think others could call us Nazis if we showed that we were in any kind related to the land of our fathers’. This makes me sad. Of course, we shall never forget what had happened. And still there was a German nation before and after world war the second, before and after Holocaust, before and after Hitler. And there had been historical episodes that one should not be proud of for other nations as well. Still they don’t stop being a nation. We stopped having an identity but our recent past more than 50 years ago. People here tell me proudly they are “half” German when I tell them where I am from. In Germany we are far more afraid of being German than people here are. Why is that? Where is my mana?

Feeling a bit embarrassed about not knowing my own nation hymen I searched for it online. It is a poem by August Heinrich Hoffmann von Fallersleben called “Das Deutschlandlied” which means the German song. The melody is from Joseph Haydn one of our famous classical musicians. However, due to our history and the change of borders after the war it is forbidden to sing the first and second verse of the original hymen. I read them and do understand that the first one is not accurate, but I didn’t understand why we shall not sing the second as it seems to be exactly what I am lacking.

Deutsche Lake near LandauFrauen, deutsche Treue,
Deutscher Wein und deutscher Sang
Sollen in der Welt behalten
Ihren alten schönen Klang,
Uns zu edler Tat begeistern
Unser ganzes Leben lang –
Deutsche Frauen, deutsche Treue,
Deutscher Wein und deutscher Sang!

 

 

German women, German faithfulness,
German wine and German song
Should maintain their good old sound around the world
and encourage us to noble deeds
through all our lives.
German women, German faithfulness,
German wine and German song!

Knowing the past and shaping the future is probably as appropriate for Germany as it is for Hawaii. I hope we can begin to really integrate and cope with our dramatic past without identifying with it anymore (I am not the Holocaust, but still I am concerned about what had happened) and also search for what else might be German and what we want “German” to be like in the future.



Openness
September 22, 2011, 10:05 pm
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Here in Hawaii I experienced something that I didn’t expect to encounter in the US. That’s openness towards other religions and religious experiences rather than fear.

I see my hanai parents praying before dinner, going to church and still practicing Tai Chi, using Chinese medicine and pointing at a Buddhist temple while driving by- smiling,

Paul, my roommate, catholic, finds another or additional part of his spirituality in the ocean playing with the waves, flourishing, feeling the energy and being fascinated by honus. He is a message therapist working not just with the body but also with different energies within his clients.

Both had a real respectful talk about a spiritual phenomenon that was not at all connected to the Christian believes but still had been experienced (other more conservative Christians would have probably considered this phenomenon satanic).

I like this openness. This makes me feel accepted with my personal believes in this society.



Hawaiian History
September 14, 2011, 10:18 pm
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For me as a foreigner coming to these amazing islands it is really exciting to discover how those were actually formed.

In my MARS1010 class I could gain some inside about that, which I’d like to share:

The Hawaiian Islands are forming over a tectonic hot spot underneath the sea in the middle of the Pacific Plate. Over time the Islands move in north western direction away from the Hot Spot and new volcanoes form which develop new Islands. As older islands move away from the hot spot they also begin to sink and built seamounts under water. The oldest seamount is Meiji and it’s about 70 million years old. The oldest Island, people live on, is Niihau, the forbitten island, which one can only access with an invitation from the hawaiian habitants of the island. The youngest is the Big Island where you can still find active volcanoes. There is a new seamount forming next to it above the hot spot which is called Loihi. This seamount will probably form a new island in millions of years.

For me it’s really fascinating being on a spot of the earth where new life begins and where energy is so dynamic and present.

I feel energetic being here. I feel as a part of life.



An Avaaz Petition
September 14, 2011, 6:24 am
Filed under: Uncategorized

48 hours to end ocean clear-cuts

Posted: 13 September 2011
Our oceans are being systematically destroyed, and we have 48 hours to raise the alarm. The seafood industry uses long chains of heavy metal disks to drag nets across the sea floor in search of fish, crushing everything in their path. This bottom-trawling is like clear-cutting a forest to catch a parrot — and only our outcry can stop it.

In two days, UN policy-makers are meeting to review the impacts of this deadly practice. Pacific island nations are fighting to save the oceans and have appealed to Avaaz members to stand with them. This is our chance to win — if enough of us speak out now, it will strengthen their hand against big fishing countries, and will embolden serious players like the US and Australia, who have already banned bottom-trawling in their waters, to push for protection everywhere.

Let’s build an urgent call to stop the senseless destruction of our oceans — and delegates will deliver our voices directly to the UN meeting. Sign now on the right and help us reach half a million voices in the next 48 hours:

Sign the petition

 

 

That’s what I found at Avaaz.org. Avaaz is a global web movement where people come together to have an influence on political decision-making as a group of international individuals and as part of a global and responsible society.

 

If somebody is interested in signing the petition, here is the link:
http://www.avaaz.org/en/stop_ocean_clear_cutting/



Funeral
September 10, 2011, 7:57 am
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Today I buried Zebra Dove.

It flew against our window yesterday. It was so pretty and I couldn’t leave it on the ground. So I ask my neighbour from Sudan whether she could help me to bury it. It was an interesting situation: two women with different cultural backgrounds and religious believes standing at the mountain looking over Waikiki and the sea burying a bird. Both knowing it was somehow important. I felt kind of sad and this reminded me of a spiritual Hawaiian ritual I once heard of in Germany. Don’t know if I get this right, so feel free to correct me (anyways would be nice to know more about it):

I was told that Hawaiians once something bad happens to someone appologize for the part they are responsible for in this situation. They do this, that is what I was told, even if they don’t seem to have something to do with the occasion at the first glance, because they truly believe that everything is connected and we are all one system.

So did I. May sound odd now, but it felt pono, when I did it.

That is it for today. I already have some things in mind a want to write about in the following days and I really appreciate this opportunity to write down my Hawaiian experiences. I guess I wouldn’t do it on my own…

Mahalo